A Look into the Future – Marketing Trends for 2018

2018 got off to a rocky start with the tide pod eating trend, so let’s take a minute and look at the new, the persistent, and the comeback trends for the new year… and reflect on why not to eat Tide Pods.

The New

  • Expect mobile phone marketing to dominate in 2018 as mobile devices recently eclipsed traditional computers for the most web searches.
  • The potential of AI (artificial intelligence) and machine learning cannot be understated, especially when they’re implemented in chatbots. Companies have been experimenting with these tools for a couple years now, but as the technology continues to develop, everyone from airlines to pizza chains are using them to improve marketing and customer experience.

 

The Persistent

  • Companies like YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram will continue to extend their reach and influence. In 2017, Facebook exceeded 2 billion monthly users while YouTube hit 1.5 billion monthly users. Yeah, that’s billion with a B. Marketing strategies through these sites will continue to impact every company looking to increase their brand recognition.
  • News organizations are getting stretched thin as they try to adapt to an evolving market. Make it easy on them and stick with the time proven press release. Press releases give you the ability to inform the community when exciting things are happening for your company. They can reach a large audience, but don’t require you to deliver them directly to the consumer.

 

The Comeback

  • After a stagnated growth rate at the beginning of the decade, the popularity of podcasts has surged in recent years thanks to increased digital media consumption and popular podcasts such as Serial. Ride this marketing wave as podcasts continue to become more popular.
  • 85% of videos on Facebook are played with no sound. What does that mean for advertisers? It’s time to bring back silent videos while still capturing consumers’ attention. Channel your inner 1940s film producer and think of creative ways to grab users attention without sound.

2017 was a wild ride. Hopefully this has helped you prepare for whatever 2018 throws your way. If there’s any way we can help, contact Targeted Persuasion today.

Your 2018 Communications Strategy

It’s 2018. Does your company have everything it needs to communicate in the New Year?

Chances are you’re just now getting back into the swing of things after a long vacation with friends and family. Your to-do list is a mile long with new projects and unfinished business from last year. Chances are your inbox isn’t even close to cleaned up after your time away.

We get it. You’re busy.

When you have a moment, I want to encourage you to take some time to look at your organization’s communications strategy. If your response is, ‘what communication strategy?’ then you really need to take some time.

A solid communication strategy is crucial to controlling how stakeholders, customers, and the general public perceive your company or association. If you pushed this off in 2017, it’s time to take a fresh look in 2018.

To start, here are a few communications tools you might need and how they can help:

A Media Kit.

As the name would suggest, a media kit – or press kit – is a bundle of visual materials designed to give media members an overview of your organization. A kit can include photos of your products or service, infographics or other representations of relevant data, leadership team bios, and a detailed description and history of your organization. Which elements and how much information to include will depend on your organization and specific needs.

Good website copy.

Chances are you’re not fully satisfied with your website. You’ve been thinking about it for a while, but it always gets pushed to the bottom of your to-do list. It’s easy to keep putting this off with everything you have going on, but it’s critical to get this right. After all, your website is often the first impression people will get of your organization when they type your name into a search engine. Make sure it’s a good one.

Is the info on your website up to date and relevant? Is it easy to read and well organized? If the answers to these questions aren’t a resounding ‘yes,’ then don’t put this off any longer.

Up-to-date Pamphlets

In a digital world, everyone seems to overlook the value of a good old-fashioned pamphlet. While this may seem a bit antiquated, the truth is a good pamphlet, brochure, or flyer is still an effective way of communicating – particularly if your office has lots of visitors swinging by or you attend lots of events.

The key is to create an item that pops. Creativity is key here. Make something that looks – and feels – appealing to the person holding it. A good design will make the reader think twice about tossing it in the garbage.

Again, the feel is important here too. Consider replacing the 24 lb. paper you would typically use with something more substantial.

These are just a few things to consider when designing a comprehensive communications plan. Best of luck telling your story in 2018. If there’s any way we can help, contact Targeted Persuasion today.

Top 5 PR Crises of 2017

2017 was a big news year. Some might even say ‘huuuuuge.’ But aside from politics, several large public relations crises also made major headlines. From United Airlines’ removal of a passenger in a brutal video, to Wells Fargo’s shady coverups of an even shadier fraud scandal, we’ve briefly recapped 2017’s top PR stories in this article. With only three weeks left in the year, let’s hope for everyone’s sake we don’t have to update this list again before January 1. 

1. United Airlines Scandal

Earlier this year, a video surfaced of law enforcement forcibly removing a passenger from a domestic flight, resulting in visible injuries to the passenger. People were outraged at United Airlines for “re-accommodating” a passenger on an overbooked flight in such an extreme manner.  

The PR team seems to have been sleeping on the job through the whole disaster. CEO Oscar Munoz issued an apology, however a leaked internal message penned by Munoz describing the victim as ‘disruptive and belligerent’ certainly undercut any pretense of sincerity.

No immediate action was taken by United on behalf of its passengers, aside from a single overbooking policy change.

This PR disaster resulted in 46% of millennials saying they would “avoid United flights.” Ouch. 

2. Harvey Weinstein and Co. Scandals

This year, starting with the high profile producer Harvey Weinstein, over 20 celebrity men have been accused of sexual harassment or assault. It appears that the culture of silence has lifted a bit and predators are being exposed in a domino effect.

Several of the alleged perpetrators initially reacted with denial and anger. These denials were often undercut by the emergence of new victims reporting their abuse and corroborating the accounts of early accusers.

These allegations have resulted in serious consequences for the accused – Kevin Spacey was removed from his House of Cards contract with Netflix, and Harvey Weinstein was booted from the board of his own company, just to name a couple. 

3. Equifax Data Breach Scandal

In September, news broke that over 140 million Americans had their security compromised in the largest data breach in history. Trust is one of the most important factors when consumers are handing over private information, so obviously this is was a huge PR nightmare.

Equifax handled the breach extremely poorly. They tried to keep the incident quiet for six weeks after it occurred, which made the crisis even worse when the news did come out. Customers weren’t able to take steps to protect themselves for six weeks while the breach was kept secret.

As if this wasn’t bad enough, Equifax offered to smooth things over by offering free credit monitoring. The only catch was that participants had to waive their rights to pursue legal action against the company. Obviously, this was penned by lawyers whose goal was to limit legal liability and not protect the company’s brand image.

This was the triple crown of public relations blunders:

Expose customers to risk of identity theft through irresponsible handling of info.

Keep the breach secret for several weeks, exposing your customers to more risk.

Offer a transparently self-serving reparation once the mistake is exposed.

4. Uber Scandals

Uber had an awful year, embroiled in scandal, lawsuits, and a revolving door of executives. One of the lowlights of the year was the February release of Susan Fowler’s whistleblowing essay, claiming a toxic culture at the company led to sexual harassment and rampant sexism. A video showing former CEO Travis Kalanick berating an Uber driver further tarnished the company’s image.

Uber’s self-inflicted wounds show that in the age of social media, human resources problems can quickly become public relations problems.  

5. Wells Fargo Fake Account Scandal

This year, the news broke that Wells Fargo employees had been creating numerous fake accounts unbeknownst to customers. These accounts helped stressed employees meet sales goals. Like with Uber, a toxic corporate culture at Wells caused massive public image problems for the company.

Wells Fargo’s response to the crisis was woefully inadequate. They went on record saying that the fake accounts were an isolated incident done by low-level employees, refusing to take responsibility for the actions of employees on their payroll. Word got out that whistleblowers were suppressed, and that more people knew about the fake accounts than was originally implied. In fact, it was a company-wide issue, not an isolated incident at all.

Conclusion:

Some of these disasters could have easily been avoided and resulted from toxic cultures emanating from leadership (Wells, Uber, Weinstein). Others were the result of a combination of bad luck, honest mistakes, and poor decisions (Equifax, United). Unless you’re the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, it’s unlikely you’ll ever have to deal with a PR nightmare on this scale. But do you have a plan in place to react if something does come up? How would you put out a fire if your organization was under public scrutiny?